← Back 15 July 2013

Moorings at Knockderry House

John Masefield’s poem Sea Fever elegantly describes the lure, appeal and joy of taking to the waves and the freedom that exploring by boat affords.

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking,
And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.

I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,
To the gull’s way and the whale’s way, where the wind’s like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover,
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.

“A windy day and white clouds flying” are common at Knockderry’s west coast location and there is sometimes a “merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover”. We also do our best to try and ensure a “quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.”

Knockderry moorings and the view down Loch Long and the Firth of Clyde.

Knockderry moorings and the view down Loch Long and the Firth of Clyde.

This photo, taken just this week, shows yachts moored at Knockderry with flat calm, Loch Long waters, clear blue skies and the magnificent view down the Firth of Clyde.

We have 5 moorings all 15 tonne rated. Visitors by boat are welcome at Knockderry House and use of our moorings is free of charge for guests using the hotel. So why not stop for a while and come ashore for a relaxing drink or spot of lunch from our Lounge Terrace Menu.

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